pubmed > NFKB > 95 ci

Polymorphisms in the NFkB, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-18 pathways are associated with response to anti-TNF therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is used for the treatment of severe cases of IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). However, one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. We have previously investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in inflammation were associated with response to anti-TNF therapy among patients with CD or UC. A new cohort of patients was established for replication of the previous findings and to identify new SNPs associated with anti-TNF response. Fifty-three SNPs assessed previously in cohort 1 (482 CD and 256 UC patients) were genotyped in cohort 2 (587 CD and 458 UC patients). The results were analysed using logistic regression (adjusted for age and gender). Ten SNPs were associated with anti-TNF response either among patients with CD (TNFRSF1A(rs4149570) (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.02-3.60, P = 0.04), IL18(rs187238) (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.00-1.82, P = 0.05), and JAK2(rs12343867) (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.02-1.78, P = 0.03)), UC (TLR2(rs11938228) (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.33-0.92, P = 0.02), TLR4(rs5030728) (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24-4.01, P = 0.01) and (rs1554973) (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.27-0.90, P = 0.02), NFKBIA(rs696) (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.06-2.00, P = 0.02), and NLRP3(rs4612666) (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.44-0.91, P = 0.01)) or in the combined cohort of patient with CD and UC (IBD) (TLR4(rs5030728) (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.01-2.11, P = 0.04) and (rs1554973)(OR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.65-0.98, P = 0.03), NFKBIA(rs696) (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01-1.54, P = 0.04), NLRP3(rs4612666) (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.57-0.95, P = 0.02), IL1RN(rs4251961) (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.66-1.00, P = 0.05), IL18(rs1946518) (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.01-1.53, P = 0.04), and JAK2(rs12343867) (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.01-1.53, P = 0.04)). The results support that polymorphisms in genes involved in the regulation of the NFκB pathway (TLR2, TLR4, and NFKBIA), the TNF-α signalling pathway (TNFRSF1A), and other cytokine pathways (NLRP3, IL1RN, IL18, and JAK2) were associated with response to anti-TNF therapy. Our multi-SNP model predicted response rate of more than 82% (in 9% of the CD patients) and 75% (in 15% of the UC patients), compared to 71% and 64% in all CD and UC patients, respectively. More studies are warranted to predict response for use in the clinic.
Publication Date: 2019-02-28
Journal: Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics

An updated meta-analysis of 37 case-control studies on the association between NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism and cancer susceptibility.
As a cell survival signal, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFKB) is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies. According to several studies, NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism is associated with the risk of different malignancies, but the results were not consistent. Therefore, we performed an updated meta-analysis based on 37 case-control studies from 33 articles (16,271 cases and 22,781 controls) to clarify the relationship. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine the strength of the association. We found that the NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to cancer in the recessive (II vs. ID+DD, OR = 1.140, 95% CI = 1.029-1.263, p =0.012), homozygote (II vs. DD, OR = 1.259, 95% CI = 1.068-1.485, p =0.006), and allele (I vs. D, OR = 1.109, 95% CI = 1.025-1.199, p =0.010) genetic models. The subgroup analysis for ethnicity found that the NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased susceptibility to cancer in Asians and with a decreased susceptibility in Caucasians. The stratified analyses revealed significant associations between the polymorphism and increased susceptibility to ovarian cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
Publication Date: 2016-07-28
Journal: Oncotarget

Polymorphisms in NFkB, PXR, LXR and risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective study of Danes.
Transcription factors and nuclear receptors constitute a link between exposure to heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from meat and tobacco smoke and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The aim of this study was to investigate if polymorphisms in nuclear factor kappa-B, pregnane X receptor, and liver X receptor were associated with risk of CRC, and to investigate possible interactions with lifestyle factors such as smoking, meat consumption, and NSAID use. The polymorphisms nuclear factor kappa-B (NFkB, NFKB1) -94 insertion/deletion ATTG (rs28362491), pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) A-24381C (rs1523127), C8055T (rs2276707), A7635G (rs6785049), liver X receptor (LXR-β, NR1H3) C-rs1405655T, T-rs2695121C were assessed together with lifestyle factors in a nested case-cohort study of 378 CRC cases and 756 random participants from the Danish prospective Diet, Cancer and Health study of 57,053 persons. Carriers of NFkB -94deletion were at 1.45-fold higher risk of CRC than homozygous carriers of the insertion allele (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.10-1.92). There was interaction between this polymorphism and intake of red and processed meat in relation to CRC risk. Carriers of NFkB -94deletion were at 3% increased risk pr 25 gram meat per day (95% CI: 0.98-1.09) whereas homozygous carriers of the insertion were not at increased risk (p for interaction = 0.03). PXR and LXR polymorphisms were not associated with CRC risk. There was no interaction between use of nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) or smoking status and NFkB, PXR or LXR polymorphisms. A polymorphism in NFkB was associated with CRC risk and there was interaction between this polymorphism and meat intake in relation to CRC risk. This study suggests a role for NFkB in CRC aetiology.
Publication Date: 2010-09-15
Journal: BMC cancer